About your Search

20121014
20121014
STATION
CNN 11
CNNW 11
FOXNEWS 11
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
KGO (ABC) 4
KPIX (CBS) 4
WRC (NBC) 4
WJLA (ABC) 3
WMAR (ABC) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 91
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)
between us." in the book she shares her experience of going up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you
las vegas. one of them was new mexico governor who serves as the honorary co-chair of his outreach committee. this begins with some brief remarks who introduces his colleague from utah. from summerlin nevada this is about 10 minutes. >> this is a gentleman -- i've been in the united states senate for 17 months. this is a gentleman who took me under his wings. this is someone i call a real trusted friend. this is someone when the republicans take the majority of the united states senate, this gentleman is going to be the chairman of the finances committee. what a difference. what a difference that will make for america. so let me introduce you. >> thank you so much. helller deserves election here. he's a terrific addition to the senate. so get out and tell everybody to vote for joe heller. they are really good candidates. what did you think of that romney debate? the democrats couldn't admit they got beaten so they started calling him a liar. how about our boy paul ryan, wasn't he great? you can see what a great team they're going to make. vine a true policy walk. he's one of the br
ranking member of the cartel. and he is accused of taking part in high profile killings in mexico including the murder of u.s. tourist david hartley tiffany's husband on that day on falcon lake. david's wife tiffany joins me right now. tiffany, i wonder if you feel a sense of vindication. >> i feel relief that mexico authorities are final low admitting that david was murder in mexico and that the cartel had involvement. >> so many looked at you as suspicion. was there something going on with tiffany and david. they investigated private life and personal life. how was that to deal with? did that compound or make more aggravating the pain you suffered? >> not only did i lose my husband and witness him being shot and killed and then i am judged and my character was judged . i had questioned. i can't tell you how relieved i am to finally have that part and the critics can't tell me i was involved or anyone else you know. >> how did that lingering suspicion affect your life. >> there was a weight on my shoulders was constantly telling my story and convince people i had no involvement a
was able to finally land on his feet just about 45 miles away from roswell, new mexico where this mission began for him early this morning. incredible feat here. still unclear whether he was able to break that record and become the first human to break that sound barrier. we do know that he has already set a record being the first human to go the highest one has ever gone in a manned balloon. that we know, and there is his picture of his mom right there. earlier she was in tears during his ascent into space, and now much relief for mom ava there, the first time she's actually left europe and there in roswell, new mexico to eyewitness this flight in history. this was not a nasa project, this was a commercial project, but many people who were part of this mission form he wierly wor with nasa. pretty incredible stuff we've been watching this afternoon. we want to bring you up to date on two very important stories we continue to follow. this, the felix baumgartner place in history, and we also want to report to you this very sad news, the death of one of the most prominent politicians to serv
mexico at sunrise. he will ride a 55 story helium balloon to the edge of space, and then jump from 23 miles high. he expects to break the sound barrier before he activates his parachute at about 5,000 feet above the new mexico desert. >>> hopefully the weather will cooperate for him and if you like warm weather than we've got the forecast for you. it's heating up again. >> and we had a jump today. we jumped a food ten degrees in comparison to yesterday when we had plenty of cloud cover and cool conditions and even isolated showers. hi everybody. let's take a look at today's high temperatures across the bay area from the low 60s in pacifica through the beaches. 78 degrees in san francisco. that's spot-on for this time of the year. low 70s in san jose down from the average high of 77. and we were in the mid 70s in santa rosa average high about four degrees off the mark. 76 in livermore. this is the scene on your saturday evening. and the city by the way. where currently it is 62 degrees. temps still into the 60s and 70s pretty much across the board tonight we'll bottom out into the 40s
's felix baumgartner and planning to free fall over new mexico jumping from the strat fear, 120,000 feet and expected to fall faster than the speed of town. his team has been pushing back the time because of the weather. he tried to make the jump on tuesday but was scratched because of the winds. we'll watch to see if felix will go flying. would you go up that high? >> no, and if i was, because i love space, i would go on a space shuttle mission. in fact the space shuttle endeavour is making its way to its new home. it was supposed to reach the science museum last night. they told people to stay inside and get out of the way, the streets were so narrow. the planned route, they didn't do their math right and they had a problem. it's still making its way slowly. they -- i don't like this part. they took down 400 trees to make way. >> but they needed to do that to let it go through the streets. >> i hope they grow back. technicians had to figure out how to maneuver the wings. folks, if you look out your window and see this live, which we're looking at, it is for real and it's on the streets
're live from roswell, new mexico. they've just now given the weather clear. ginger zee has done a lot of crazy stuff for the sake of this broadcast. what do you think? >> right after felix does it. >> he's setting the bar high. >> that's the proper attitude of caution. >>> who says becoming a parent means giving up any daredevil indulgences? one dad satisfied his need for speed with this souped up stroller. peter, i hope you're not watching. >>> we're going switch gears. beginning with the breaking news out of colorado and the hunt for a child predator. police are investigating an attempted abduction overnight, following the disappearance and murder of 10-year-old jessica ridgeway. no word if there is a connection yet. an entire community is on edge. here's abc's clayton sandell. >> reporter: in a community attempted abduction, just 12 miles down the road from where jessica ridgeway was killed. someone tried to snatch a 13-year-old boy. his mom snapped a picture of this car. >> i think all children should pay attention to what they're doing. >> reporter: there is sadness, anger, fear.
news." >> and good evening, everyone, i'm jeff glor. in the sky over new mexico today a man jumped from 24 miles up and broke the sound barrier on the way down. a first. felix baumgartner broke that barrier by more than 100 miles an hour, then landed with ease. with details, here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: felix baumgartner climbed into the strat sphere more than 24 miles above new mexico's desert. the 43-year-old austrian skydiver was about to become a human missile and plunge farther and fast never freefall than anyone in history. >> everything is in the green, doing great. >> reporter: his ascent had landed two and a half hours, in a capsule hoisted by a 55 story helium balloon, rising 1,000 feet a minute. the only hitch, baumgartner's viser foingd up when his helmet's heater stopped working. >> this is getting serious, joe. >> i do not think i have safe feeting -- -- heating. >> joe kittinger was the voice in his ear. >> there it, there is the world out there. >> reporter: in 1960 kittinger, then an air force captain set the freefall record with a dive from 102,000 feet. he spe
that far away. mission control is in roswell, new mexico. you will be hearing some audio momentarily from them. you can also see him kind of conversing likely with mission control right now. brian todd is watching closely as is chad myers in atlanta. brian joins us from washington. brian spent a good part of last week in roswell and got to know some of the players involved in this. chad with a very great understanding of the science behind all of this this morning, all systems are go. there were some moments because of wind they thought perhaps conditions were not perfect. in the end, looked like perfect conditions for the ascent. chad, let's begin with you. mission control very excited that already one record has been set just by virtue of the fact he met that goal of altitude. >> right. that's above anybody else in a balloon. the two men in that balloon, two separate men didn't make it to earth safe, they died in 1961. so this is not without threat. this is a major issue for felix to get down from there, literally, go the speed of sound awhile in a free fall, and finally land with a par
from mexico has also found salmonella from the processing plant. sunland. with 35 illnesses over 19 states sold at trader joe's. and also a voluntary recall found and natures recipe with a limited supply of the natures recipe this was made in topeka, kansas. this is precautionary with no pat or human illnesses have been reported. >> eagles quarterback. no family pet dog illnesses have been reported. >> michael b--vick. is trying to develop a healthy relationship with animals by getting a family dog. >> the latest on a police investigation after a bullet hits the a campaign office. and the space shuttle endeavor will have to wait a and the space shuttle endeavor will have to wait a bit. the latest on measures... measure up. money to our schools. "misleading." out here. it. but there's hope. straight to our schools... politicians. yes on thirty-eight. oÑ and the space shuttle endeavor will have to wait a bit. the latest on when i take a picture of this check, it goes straight to the bank. oh. oh look the lion is out! no mommy no! don't worry honey, it only works on checks. deposit ch
goal, to free fall farther and faster than any human ever. we're live from roswell, new mexico. in fact, they've just now given the weather clear for this, and ginger zee, our meteorologist, has done lots of crazy stuff for the sake of this broadcast. this is her next thing. what do you think? >> right after felix does it. we'll see how it goes first. >> he's setting the bar high. >> that's the proper attitude of caution. >>> and who says becoming a parent means giving up any daredevil indulgences? well, we'll introduce you to one dad who satisfied his need for speed with this souped up stroller. his plans for it may surprise you. peter, i hope you're not watching this at home right now. >> he's angling for the cover of "bad parenting" magazine. >> yeah. >> all right. well, we are going to switch gears and begin with that sad search for just disin colorado and the hunt for a child predator. a community is in mourning and on edge this morning following the disappearance and murder of jessica ridgeway. they have no suspects but creating the profile of a killer on the loose. here's abc's c
that is gathered out there in roswell, new mexico very shortly, if he's not doing it already. so he's well enough to talk and we have been trying to correspond with some of the red bull people to ask what his condition is, from all visual signs right now, he's doing very well. you saw him land and raise his fist to the air, the piece of video that we're seeing, the hop into history and the incredible rate of speed was just compelling. he landed about an hour and 45 minutes ago. he did break the speed of sound, that mark, 690 miles an hour, how fast he actually went, red bull is saying he went about 704 miles an hour. but we did see on the monitors during his job that he hit got 729 miles an hour. so we'll get an official reading of exactly how fast he went. but a real thrill as he jumped from higher than anyone has ever jumped, 128,000 feet. that's about 8,000 feet higher than they expected him to jump. >> and why was balm baumgartner committed to this jump. >> he is a daredevil, he base jumped off the towers, and base jumped off the chrysler statue in reno. but nothing ever to this magnitude. wh
. the austrian expects conditions will be right for tomorrow's jump near roswell. new mexico. at sunrise baumgartner will rise in a capsule carried by massive helium balloon and then jump from 23 miles high. he expects to reeds speech up to 7 -- reach speeds up to 700 miles an hour breaking the sound barrier as he plunges back to earth. >>> well, college student from the bay area is the proud owner o a new -- of a new car after he sank the unbelievable basketball shot. this video is from san diego state's midnight madness event last night. that's the native craig horbach. he makes a half court heave to win a new set of wheels. no word on the price make or model but it's safe to say he upstaged the actual basketball players at least for one night. what'd you say san diego state right? >> home of my aztecs. >> all right, good evening everybody. it's live it's our cbs 5 weather camera. what a difference a day makes, the abundance of sunshine and now the days that will top off in the 90s as eyewitness news continues right here on cbs 5. c dentures are very different to real teeth. they're ab
for tomorrow's jump near roswell, new mexico. they will travel to the edge of space. then he's going to jump from 23 miles high. he should reach super sonic speeds as he falls at 700 miles an hour, breaking the sound barrier. >>> we hear stories every week about silicon valley companies hiring, but what's not getting attention are all the layoffs. >> reporter: with each new product, each ground-breaking innovation, high-tech is an employment magnet. >> there is a hiring boom in silicon valley. >> reporter: chris helps high- tech workers find jobs. the tougher part is keeping those jobs. >> occupations are created and destroyed here faster than anywhere else, just like new technologies are created and destroyed faster and replaced, and they become obsolete faster than anywhere else. >> reporter: with every every new round of hiring, there are also layoffs by the thousands. the unemployment rate in the silicon valley is 8.5%, higher than the national average. >> life is not as great in silicon valley as we'd like to think. >> reporter: tom, a logistics manager, has been downsized four times. >
the source of the oil sheen in the gulf of mexico. it is near the rig explosion and spill in 2010. bp said it is likely coming from a pipe that once connected the rig to the well. in addition to the robots. they will you'll satellite information. they are going to cover the cost of this operation. >>> one other person died with the meningitis outbreak t now brings the toll to 15. there are two hub reported cases. the outbreak is linked to steroid shots used for back pain. it was produced by a pharmacy in massachusetts. they have been recalled and the company is shut down. >>> right now a palo alto boy is being p home schooled because of a debate of his health. he carries a genetic mutation of cystic fibrosis. >> he is healthy and officials worry he could endanger other students with cystic fibrosis. they ordered him to go to another district middle school and while the disease is not contagious. bacteria from patients could be take russ to others with the same disease. a hearing will be held to see whether he can attend school. >> after hours of hard work. a mural is restored at a san fran
mexico deserted. best known for leaping off skyscrapers. his mother and father were there showing signs of relief. you can only imagine what was going through their minds. it could help with future space exploration, and another way to safely escape should problems arrive. >> heather: what it could mean for our astronauts. thank you so much. >> gregg: i was skeptical that he would make it. he also had on deal with extreme weather through this whole thing in new mexico. they had to postpone the jump earlier this week because of the incredibly high winds there. meteorologist maria molina is watching the weather in the area. you were probably like me. we watched him sitting on the edge of the capsule, there is no way he can survive this. what an incredible feat. >> i can't take an elevator ride up to the top of the empire state building to think he is making such a huge jump. very brave. we do have very quiet conditions out across new mexico. we saw conditions improve with the weather. the reason why they were so unsettled because the storm system has moved east and bringing some travel is
. finally 4 1/2 minutes later, baumgartner pulled his chute and floated to a landing in the new mexico desert. >> you're out there, you do not want to die in front of your parents, your girlfriend. >> reporter: it was extraordinary. nasa feels that there could be amount to be learned and the techniques that could be used on future nasa space missions. >> what happened to the capsule? >> it also came down via parachute in the new mexican desert and we're told it's in good shach good shape. >>> we're just 48 hours from the second presidential debate. the president and mitt romney are hunkered down in heavy prep mode and in last week's vice presidential debate, the debate between the top two on the ticket could be a barn burrer. >> reporter: president obama took a break this afternoon surprising supporters. he told reporters debate camp is off to a good start. >> it is going great. >> reporter: mitt romney hunkered down preparing in boston, attended church this morning with wife ann after spending saturday trying to chip away at the president's narrow lead in battleground state of ohio. r
reaching speeds of more than 833 miles per hour before safely landing in the desert in new mexico. baumgartner wore a special eye-tech suit and used a special capsule to travel those 24 miles up to make that historic jump. he also had a mission control team on the ground monitoring his every move and they were very happy to see him land safely. there he goes down on his knees. what an adventurer. >>> still ahead tonight, social security recipients are getting a raise. everybody can expect more money next year, but it won't be enough to break the bank. >>> some people will see more money in their ereader accounts courtesy of a price fixing lawsuit. >>> and the long and winding road for the space shuttle "endeavour" has finally come to an end. an end. remember when you said men are superior drivers? yeah. yeah. >>> if you collect social security, don't expect a big jump in your monthly benefits next year. the annual cost of living adjustment will be announced tuesday. it's based on inflation and it's only expected to add about $12 to $24 a month to the average social security check
. felix bombgardner landed safely in new mexico today after a 24- mile jump from the stratosphere. the australian daredevil hit earth just nine minutes after jumping from his capsule. but a foggy helmet almost caused him to scrub the jump. >> when i was standing there on top of the world, you become so humbled that you cannot think about breaking records anymore, you wanted to come back alive. if you cannot see anything, you cannot leave that capsule. >> he set a new record for the highest and the fastest supersonic jump, but not the longest. the jump came in 16 seconds under the current world record. >>> covering the washington monument grounds today. thousands of the breast cancer survivors and theirers wrapped up the three-day awareness walk. the 60-mile trek started things out in southeast washington. ending their day with family and friends ready to meet the walkers at the finish. >> it was fantastic. they got a few bumps. it was great. donate. just donate three days, 60 miles. very tired, all ready to go home. [ laughter ] pretty excited. [ cheering ] >> this weekend's eve
the balloon that will take him 26- miles above roswell, new mexico. he is in the space suit because he is going to try to break the sound barrier and do the height and speed as he drops down the parachute. >> it will take about three hours to get to the height he is going for, 23-miles in the air. then the defense will begin -- decent will begin. this will be the fastest, furtherrest free fall. >> the balloon taking him up, the distance is 55 stories between him and the capsule. that is rather amazing. he will drop. he says if he has successful on this, it will with his final chute. >> i could be that being final. he will be so high there will be no oxygen in the air. this has been a long time coming. they have been planning for this for some time as you can see. we will continue to monitor it for you. >> that is good. >>> meanwhile back on planet earth -- . >> yes, equally as exciting or mother so if we may -- more so if we may say, game one of the giants taking on the st. louis cardinals at at&t park. yesterday they held separate practice sessions on field. bees around the stadiu
a skydive from 23 miles above the earth. and this was the scene as he launched from rosswell, new mexico around 8:30 this morning. he's inside a capsule being lifted by a 30 million tube pick foot helium balloon. the jump was postponed twice last week by high winds. this is a live picture you are seeing here. it will take several hours for him to reach the edge of space to make the jump. if he touches the capsule on his way out it could tear his protective suit and that could be deadly. n.a.s.a. is testing the suit by possible use by astronauts in making emergency escapes. now during his free fall bumgarner hopes to become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier, which means he would become the first supersonic skydiver. >>> in other news this morning an east bay community on alert this weekend after a series of mail thefts. but neighbors do have one advantage, surveillance video. abc7 news reporter sergio quintana has the details. >> here he's on the property running up past the car. he has a cigarette in his hand. >> what you are listening to is one of the victims in a series of
education. he was such a tyrant's about it. he often threatens to send me back to mexico if i did not do well in school. that was a scary threats. i did not want to go back to mexico. i wanted to make him proud. another thing i felt was that because i begged him to bring me, i felt that i owed him that. i felt that i never wanted my father to say i should not have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award and growing up an illegal alien in los angeles tonight at 8:00 eastern. >> "washington journal"continue as -- host: the political columnist ed "the washington times." in his column this morning, he writes that this coming week may live up to the characterization that every week is a make or break a week of the campaign after labor day. do you think this week is a big win for the candidates? guest: in washington again breathless about things like debates. i think it is important. foreign policy is an area that people have to prove that they can meet a certain threshold and are not completely out of their depth in terms of dealing with a lot of
falling over new mexico 23-miles to the ground. this is going happen we understand when hits 120,000 feet. he is hoping to break it 52-year-old altitude record of 19.5 miles. you may have heard this the last few days the stunt has been canceled numerous times because of weather concerns but they believe that his tore arery is going to be made today. he is just moments away from doing this jump and what he is attempting to do is to break the speed of sound in free fall essentially with his body. the researchers involved with this say it will provide important medical and scientific data that they can study. he is getting close to the point where they tell us he is going to make the jump from space. >> and. >> shannon: he has reached the 120,000-foot mark the point at which we are told he would be preparing to jump and freefall to earth. ever >> balloons fill. floating up. now, above what had been set as sort of the mythical float rate or maximum altitude of 120,000. so it has gone up. going up slowly. 8 miles an hour up now. oh, no, i'm sorry that is the speed across the ground. 8 miles an
, and he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school, but -- >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was because i real ly did believe him. >> host: you did not want to go back to mexico. >> guest: yeah, and i wanted to make him proud, and i felt that because i begged him to bring me, i felt i owed him that. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves,
, they should be inflating the balloon right about now, rapid randi. it's out in new mexico. it's about 6:00 a.m. out there. i think the latest we've heard from red bull is that the launch could take place maybe m next hour or so. maybe hour and a half. they're monitoring wind conditions, of course. that was what did in the last attempt on tuesday morning. it's kind of just a key thing that they're monitoring on the ground there is the wind speed. that's what's caused two different delays here. we think maybe the launch of the balloon should take place the next hour, hour and a half or so. at that point it will take about two and a half to three hours for him to get up to the point from which he will jump 120,000 feet above the surface of the earth. you know, that's the progression of this thing. it takes about two and a half to three hours to reach that point. then he will jump, and then the first 30 to 40 seconds he is expected to break the sound bearier to free-fall at a speed of more than 698 miles an hour. the entire jump son-in-law supposed to take about 15 minutes. >> i guess a lot of p
he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was a scary threat because they did believe him. i didn't want to go back to mexico and i wanted to make him proud. and then another thing i felt it was that because i baked him to bring me, i felt that i owed him that. i never wanted my father just say i shouldn't have right -- brought you. >> melanie kirkpatrick and joseph kim, one of the people profiled in her boat, "escape from north korea" to discuss the experiences of north koreans who fled the country. this book is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> did after nine welcome to the hudson institution new york book forum to celebrate the publication of "escape from north korea: the untold story of asia's underground railroad." by senior fellow, melanie kirkpatrick. i am ken weinstein, president and ceo of hudson institute and i also like to welcome our audience watching at home on booktv and i also want to especially thank our friends at c-span for covering today's event. there are a couple of g
was postponed because of unexpected wind but today's weather in new mexico seems to be cooperating. today is the 65th anniversary of the supersonic aircraft flight test pilot, chuck yeager. and let us check the outside. the bay area fog. janu? >> good morning we can see that blanket of fog and cloud coverage. pretty wide spread. and the mixture of clouds tomorrow with that warming trend continuing and but it is action going to be pretty hot by mid-week. there are airport delays nearly 75 minutes if you want to consider that if your going to be picking anybody up? temperatures are in the 50s and 60s indicated by the green on your screen. however, buying and plenty of 70's. for the afternoon 80s. it is going to be a beautiful day today. cooling off to the 60s by 8:00 p.m. for those going out. this is what it could look like in the south bay. mid-70s in redwood city, palo alto and milpitas. places like antioch, livermore and 79 degrees in walnut creek. low 70's for the east bayshore. mid-70s for the coast. and mainly mid upper 70's in the north bay. as we take a look at the satellite and rad
, the only countries that are worse for mexico and chile. so what about germany? what happened is since 1985 the average salary of german workers has risen five times faster than in america. so if you can't afford to pay more and can't compete globally, how do all of the big companies do it? well, if the companies can make it the country as a whole can't make it may be as the economy as a whole. let me just tell you that in the last decade germany rated 2 trillion-dollar trade surplus against the competition from china, india, the asian tigers and the united states ran a 6 trillion-dollar trade deficit. so we are facing the same global competition that we were and they did $8 trillion better than we could and they were paying their workers more. how could that be? it doesn't make sense, does it? the next thing is we are told we can't compete on the old manufacturing basis. we've got to become a service economy. you've got to go out and learn knowledge shots. that's where the future is. i've got a couple of chapters on what happened to the knowledge economy in the last decade and my book. wha
mexico is looking good for felix baumgartner's latest attempt. he plans to parachute 23 miles from the earth. he noted that tomorrow is the day of the anniversary that chuck yeager first broke the sound barrier from a plane in 1957. >> 50 years ago tomorrow, the cuban missile crisis was sparked. president jfk and his aides worked to avoid a confrontation with russian president khruschchev. the soviet missiles left cuba and the u.s. dismantled its own missile installations in turkey. a new recall, targeting a popular dog treat and the first of its kind fire drill and why officials say today's exercise was particularly important flood watch and cancellations are coming to american airlines and why the air carrier is cutting back on flights and how long it will last. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if
above the new mexico desert where he opened his capsule, hung his feet out the door, was reminded to unfasten his seatbelt, saluted, and he just jumped right into the record books. he plummeted at an incomprehensible 833 miles an hour, so fast, the only way to see him in this infrared camera. the first human to break the sound barrier with just his body, no jet, no rocket. he tumbled out of control for a few tense seconds, then righted himself and managed to make a sound. it was enough for mom. >> okay, here we go, felix. >> reporter: the entire way up and down, felix heard only one voice. >> that a boy. >> reporter: it was the voice of experience. 84-year-old joe kittinger held the record for the highest free fall for 52 years. today, he talked felix through shattering that record by more than 25,000 feet. >> whoa! >> reporter: high winds delayed liftoff last week, but nothing, it seemed, could keep felix from the stratosphere today. he even returned to earth on his feet with a record that is simply out of this world. >> when you stand up there on the top of the world, you become
to believe? >> the quote in the same breath he said that he wanted to restore the mexico city policy that taxpayer funds wouldn't to go abortion abroad. >> but they don't go. >> isle i'm telling you what the quote said, clarify what the quote said. this is taking one sentence out of context to me. >> he's been very clear over quite a long period of time that he would de fund planned parenthood. he has been unequivocal on that subject. he's also been asked to the supreme court justices were that he identified with and the kind that he would appoint, and it's justice scalia, one more scalia would result in a reversal of row v. wade, robert bjork heads his judicial collection selection fo for the campaign. robert bjork we know wrote the roadmap for how to overturn roe versus wade. he is sending maybe it's dog whistles but people getting the message. >> during this week vice-presidential debate the candidates were asked about their views on abortion. >> i do not believe that -- that we have a right to tell other people that, women that they can't control their body. it's a decision betwe
, diversity in the classroom. >> would 3% be enough in new mexico, your bordering state, where the african-american population is around 2%? >> your honor, i don't think it would. i mean, our concept of critical mass is not tied to demographics. it is said that we are not pursuing any demographic poll. it is undisputed that race is only a factor. it is undisputed that we're taking race into account only to consider individuals in their totality. >> mr. garre, i think the issue my colleagues are asking is, at what point and when do we stop defering to the -- defering to the university's judgment that race is still necessary? that's the bottom line of this case. you're saying, and i think rightly because of our cases, that you can't set a quota. that's what our cases say you can't do. so if we're not going to set a quota, what do you think is the standard we apply to make a judgment? >> i think the one that you would ply is you would -- apply is you would look to whether or not the university had reached an environment where people do not feel like a spokesperson for their race. where the ed
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)